Sugar-Free Angel Food Cake

published by Angelgirlpj on Jun 12, 2010

Where did you learn to make your first angel food cake; from your mom or grand mother? What about a sugar-free angel food cake? Was it still from family or did you find the sugar-free recipe on the Internet?

Where did you learn to make your first angel food cake; from your mom, grand mother or recipe from the Internet? While making your angel food cake, keep in mind using organic free-range eggs and diet sweetener, like Splenda or Stevia, will make your cake a bit healthier. Diabetics appreciate desserts like sugar-free angel food cake recipes.

According to whatscookingamerica.net, “Rotary Egg Beaters – The rotary egg beater eliminated the long and laborious hand beating of eggs and batters. The rotary egg beater was purchased in sufficient numbers to make a substantial impact on American cooking. In the Sears 1897 catalogue a “Dover” egg beater sold for 9¢. 1865 – The first patents for rotary egg beaters began showing up around 1865. 1870 – Turner Williams of Providence, Rhode Island invented and patented, US Patent #103811, the hand-cranked egg beater with two intermeshed, counter-rotating whisks. It was an improvement on earlier rotary egg beaters that had only one whisk.” They go on to add, “Some historians think that the first angel food cakes were probably baked by African-American slaves from the South because making this cake required a strong beating arm and lots of labor to whip the air into the whites. Angel food cakes are also a traditional African-American favorite for post-funeral feasting.”

Since slaves, have been set free, and we have electric mixers. Try making a sugar free angel food cake.

Things needed:

  • 3/4-cup diet sugar, such as Splenda or Stevia in the raw
  • 1-cup flour
  • 1 ½-cups egg whites; 10-12 large organic eggs
  • 1 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
  • 3/4-cup diet sugar, of choice
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 ½ tsp. vanilla
  • ½ tsp. almond extract
  • Mixing bowls
  • Sifter
  • Electric Mixer
  • Spatula
  • Tube or Bundt cake pan
  1. Move the oven rack to lowest position. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Properly pre-heating your oven will guarantee your cake to bake correctly.  Newer ovens have a beeper or light to tell you when it’s heated but in case it doesn’t 30 minutes will be sufficient.
  2. Sift together in a mixing bowl the flour and ¾ cup of sugar. Sift two or three times to ensure it has combined properly. Set aside for later use.
  3. Beat, in a separate bowl, the egg whites. Mix on high speed until they rise and get foamy. Add in the cream of tarter, remaining sugar and salt. While still on high speed add in the vanilla and almond extract. When you pull beaters out of the mixture peaks will form.
  4. Fold, not stir, the flour mixture into your fluffy egg whites a little at a time until blended together.
  5. Pour the batter into non-greased pan; any oily residue that might be on the pan must be wiped off with a paper towel as your angel food cake will not climb the pan properly.
  6. Cut gently through the batter with the spatula and then level the top of cake.
  7. Place the cake pan in the pre-heated oven and bake for 35-40 minutes. You will know when the cake is done when lightly touched the cake will spring back.
  8. Turn the angel food cake pan upside down suspending it from the center hole onto a glass or bottle. Keep the cake that way until it is cooled. By keeping the pan upside down the cake can cool easier and will help keep it from compressing and deflating.

Tips:

  • Properly pre-heating your oven will guarantee your cake to bake correctly.
  • Eggs at room temperature for at least an hour beat up better.
  • If you don’t have an angel food cake pan you can use a spring form cake pan with a glass in the center.
  • It might be necessary to loosen side of cake with knife to remove from pan.
  • Use egg yokes to make homemade Popeye noodles
  • If your cake does not work right the first time I have found in other sugar-free recipes that reducing the salt, increasing moisture and baking powder makes a difference.
  • This sugar-free cake goes great with strawberries.


8 Responses so far | Have Your Say!

  1. # 1 by Joie Schmidt
    June 12th, 2010 at 4:05 pm #

    Sounds wonderful!

    Blessings.

    Sincerely,

    -Joie Schmidt.

  2. # 2 by write4money
    June 14th, 2010 at 3:15 am #

    I do not know much about it, but after reading your articles are well aware nothing has happened.

    I encourage you to write more.

    Anjalina

  3. # 3 by sara20
    June 16th, 2010 at 6:35 pm #

    Excellent manner and very well-written sentence is doing, with useful information includes a good things you have in your article.

    Thanks and cheers.
    Sara

  4. # 4 by CA Johnson
    June 21st, 2010 at 7:20 pm #

    This is a great recipe. I like angel food cake, but I never knew how to make sugar free angel food cake.

  5. # 5 by Maihaa
    January 29th, 2011 at 10:14 am #

    Angelgirlpj -
    I see in this recipe “Sugarless Angel Food Cake”, that you have listed 3/4 cup of sugar substitute twice! (See above, or below):
    “Things needed:

    * 3/4-cup diet sugar, such as Splenda or Stevia in the raw
    * 1-cup flour
    * 1 ½-cups egg whites; 10-12 large organic eggs
    * 1 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
    * 3/4-cup diet sugar, of choice

    Well, I don’t know what “Stevia in the raw” is (I understand that Stevia is a kind of leaf, although I have never seen “Stevia in the raw” selling anywhere, only the highly concentrated form of Stevia, that they say on the package is 200 to 300 times as sweet as most sugars, so the package says to use only 1 packet (or small scoop included in bag) = 2 tsp
    Is the two different listings of 3/4 cup sugar substitute in this recipe a mistake? It seems this would be far too sweet with SteviaSweet or powdered extract.
    I also bought some Xylitol – “Xylitol is roughly as sweet as sucrose but with two-thirds the food energy (calories). (Wikipedia)”, but I don’t know how much to use in this recipe, either alone, or combine half and half with Stevia, which is often recommended.
    Please answer soon, since my grand daughter’s Birthday is coming up soon… and she loves Angel Food Cake!
    Maihaa

  6. # 6 by Angelgirlpj
    January 29th, 2011 at 4:15 pm #

    There are 2 sugars as one goes in the egg whites when you fluff them. Stevia in the Raw is less concentrated like Splenda baking formula. I find it in our Martins and Kroger’s supermarkets. If you can find it Splenda would work. Good luck.

  7. # 7 by Maihaa
    January 31st, 2011 at 8:41 am #

    Thanks for your reply, Angelgirlpj.
    I live in Canada, near Calgary, Alberta, and we have no Martins and Kroger’s supermarkets here. I’ll check the various health food stores.
    I have seen “Splenda” selling, so I’ll check for it, too.
    So this recipe uses two different 3/4 cup portions of “sugar substitute” (other than the concentrated Stevia extract).
    What about using Xylitol (which I already purchased)… are you familiar with this “sugar substitute”? Have you ever tried it in this recipe? If I was to use it, do you have a recommended amount? Would it be the same as above (3/4 cup… twice)?
    I appreciate your replies.
    Maihaa

  8. # 8 by Angelgirlpj
    January 31st, 2011 at 8:03 pm #

    Yes you are using the sugar substitute twice. I am unfamiliar with the product you talk about, sorry. Do you have Wal-marts? They carry alot of different stuff.
    Here’s the link to Stevia in the raw:
    http://www.steviaextractintheraw.com/Our-Products.aspx
    If you have time you could research where to find it in your area or possible order it.
    Good luck!

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